Tracing the family DNA

My mother was tracing the family history a few years ago. I’ll have to ask what she found.

Obviously, her research couldn’t have gone as deep as tracking genetic heritage, but I’d love to see what my DNA said about my ancient forebears.

The study analysed the DNA of over 2,000 people from rural areas of the UK, whose four grandparents were all born within 50 miles of each other. This provided the researchers with a snapshot of UK genetics in the late 19th Century before mass migration events. (It is a pity the study did not extend to the modern population of the Republic of Ireland as their genetic links to the rest of the British Isles would be fascinating to see).What it shows about the UK population is that many local communities have stayed put for almost 1,500 years – many for far longer – and that their strong sense of regional identity with their birthplace is deep in their DNA.This is most strikingly seen in the genetic split between people living in modern Cornwall and Devon where the division lies exactly along the county border along the River Tamar; the people living on either side of the river have different DNA.

(Also, note the large area of Southwest Ireland consistently named as Mumu. Home to the Justified Ancients?)

Source: Maps of Britain and Ireland’s ancient tribes, kingdoms and DNA


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