1:32nd


1:32nd scale interior details for race and drift cars

Another new 3D product designed by me. I’ve got a bunch of 1:32nd scale car models in the to-build pile, many of them Japanese. So I’ve designed some interior parts inspired by drifters and Kanjo street racers. There are extended gear shifters (one based on a samurai sword), a hydraulic hand brake, battery isolation switches and digital data loggers.


1:32nd resin car bodies

Every so often I’ll get obsessed with a particular modelling subject and buy lots of kits, most of which may never get made (by me at least). A couple of years ago, whilst writing a “propellerpunk” sci-fi tale, I got loads of models of less well known planes- prototypes which never made it into production, Luft46 fantasies, that sort of thing. I’ve still got the flying wing, and that may yet get built, but most of the rest have gone the way of EBay.

My new obsession is 1:32nd scale model cars. They don’t take up too much space and they come in some interesting subjects. Arii do some cool Japanese retro vehicles, though I have to find them on EBay as it seems no-one in the UK stocks them. Airfix did an equally interesting range of British vehicles. But they’re mostly out of production now, and the rarer ones can get a bit pricey.

These resin slot car bodies by Pendle Slot Racing may be a source of interesting British classics to customise, if I ever work my way through the backlog I’ve already got. The bodies are £20-£40 each, it’s true, and I’d have to provide chassis and interior detail, but I could have fun creating a very British custom car meet with a few of them.

Or I could buy myself a Scalextric track, build them for their intended purpose and re-enact chases from The Sweeney and The Professionals with them.


Ratty T is finished


Ratty T, originally uploaded by spinneyhead.

I completed the rat rod T bucket a few weeks ago, but have only just got the photos uploaded.

Ratty T engine

The engine wiring is fairly basic, just the wires going to the spark plugs, no fuel or coolant lines. The exhaust pipes are aluminium tubing trimmed and superglued to the block, a bit more realistic than the plastic pipes that came with it.

Ratty T interior

The interior is basic. I didn’t add any extra detailing. All the gauges are sporting a very ratty black on black look.

Ratty T rear end

The fuel tank is a drop tank, probably 1:72nd, from the spares bin.

Ratty T

And here’s the T from the side. I’m looking for interesting new ways to display my models, this one’s going to be mounted in a picture frame, so it can be stood on someone’s desk like a photo of the family.

There are a few more photos of the build in the Ratty T set.


Ratty T


Model T chassis- front Z, originally uploaded by spinneyhead.

I’ve become fascinated by rat rods in the last year or so, so when I got a Lindberg model T in 1:32nd scale it seemed natural that I should make something old school.

It’s a simple model, so I’ll try to keep my modifications to it simple. The first step was to drop the body nearer the ground. As in the real thing, this was done by Z’ing the frame. The chassis is cast as a single piece incorporating the sump and some of the front suspension. The trailing arms helped me line everything back up when I cut through the rails just behind the radiator mount. The thickness of the cut allowed me to insert a section of plastic strip into the gap which gave a firm mount for the step. A similar process was followed at the rear.

The frame rails and suspension have been painted Games Workshop Chaos Black, my flat black of choice. The sump and trailing arms will probably be Boltgun Metal. Everything will get a light coat of rust before the car goes together.


Wish List Time

At the moment I’m collecting, more than making, models. And I don’t have the money or the space to do much of that, either.

But that’s not going to stop me drawing up a wish list of kit’s I’d like to get my hands on or see produced. Quite a few of them are driven by a desire to start painting 54mm figures, particularly Andrea’s character series and placing them in dioramas involving relevant vehicles.

1. Arii’s Collectors’ Series available in the UK. I’ve developed a crush on these 1:32nd scale curbside models without ever seeing one or reading a review. I’m watching a lot of Kung Fu movies at the moment and I want to put Bruce Lee on a street with a delivery trike behind him and scattered boxes and other debris. I could order the models from Japan, or EBay shops in Australia or Hong Kong, but I’d really like to be able to get them from my local model shop or one of the bigg online shops like Hannants.

2. More of Airfix’s 1:32nd scale ’60s and ’70s saloons re-released. I’ve read that some of the moulds were damaged or lost, and I may be the total market for a Morris Marina model. What I really want is the Ford Capri and Ford Escort. (I know the latter was in last year’s three car special set, so I’ll see if I can pick up one of those.) I don’t have any plans for these in figure terms, just an abiding fondness formed from reading Street Machine and Custom Car in my youth. Whilst we’re about it, let’s have a Ford Pop (Anglia in the States, I think) in that scale. I know there was a 1:24th, or 1:25th van version by one of the US manufacturers, but let’s have the saloon beloved of British hotrodders.

3. Photoetched parts for 1:72nd scale cars such as the ones from Cararama. You can get them for 1:87th cars (and, a little, for 1:76th ones as well), so let’s have them for my braille scale of choice. I’m going to start producing transfers and stuff again, so one day I may be the person who satisfies this desire. (Affiliate link Cararama 1:72nd cars on EBay)

4. Retro robo. This is a personal project, I don’t want anyone to produce it. I just need to find an appropriate Japanese robot to kit bash and lots of spare parts to use in the bashing.

5. Preiser 1:72nd stuff. I know they do a lot of good stuff in this scale, I just can’t find it in my local model shops.

That’s what I want right now. That, and the money to afford it all.

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